Public Safety Telecommunicators are communications personnel responsible for receiving and transmitting pure and reliable messages, tracking vehicles and equipment, and recording other important information. A number of organizations, including police and fire departments, emergency medical services, motorcycle couriers, taxicab providers, trucking companies, railroads, and public utility companies, use dispatchers to relay information and coordinate their operations. Essentially, the dispatcher is the "conductor" of the force, and is responsible for the direction of all units within it. 


 "Public safety dispatchers" (also known as emergency dispatchers, Telecommunicators or 9-1-1 dispatchers) receive calls from individuals who need assistance from Firefighters, Police Officers, and Emergency Medical Services. Once information is obtained from the caller, these dispatchers activate the services necessary to respond to the nature of the call for help. Dispatchers are an integral part of the organization's success. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, about 10% of all dispatchers employed in the United States in 2004 were public safety dispatchers.

NFPA 1061 PUBLIC SAFETY TELECOMMUNICATOR I & II

Public Safety Telecommunicator I & II (Emergency and Non-Emergency Communication Center Operator/Dispatcher) the telecommunicator’s duties are multifaceted, and the day-to-day routine can shift to a crisis with only a moment’s notice. Because the computer industry has changed the way the world functions, today’s telecommunicator must possess computer skills and be proficient in the use of a variety of technology-based equipment. The new wireless industry creates even more challenges for the telecommunicator. The telecommunicator must also communicate effectively, which includes being able to calm callers, gather appropriate data, and communicate clearly with responding units. The telecommunicator must also possess organizational skills and the ability to perform multiple tasks.

Course Objectives:

  • Describe the roles and responsibilities of the Public Safety Telecommunicator.
  • Describe the communication equipment and maintenance.
  • Describe maps, logs, resources, and troubleshooting initial response.
  • Describe the functions of a communication center.
  • Describe rules and regulations, policies, and standard
    operating procedures.
  • Describe placing responding units on emergency incidents.
  • Describe the challenges for the twenty-first century Public Safety Telecommunicator.

NFPA 1061 PUBLIC SAFETY TELECOMMUNICATOR I & II

Public Safety Telecommunicator I & II (Emergency and Non-Emergency Communication Center Operator/Dispatcher) the telecommunicator’s duties are multifaceted, and the day-to-day routine can shift to a crisis with only a moment’s notice. Because the computer industry has changed the way the world functions, today’s telecommunicator must possess computer skills and be proficient in the use of a variety of technology-based equipment. The new wireless industry creates even more challenges for the telecommunicator. The telecommunicator must also communicate effectively, which includes being able to calm callers, gather appropriate data, and communicate clearly with responding units. The telecommunicator must also possess organizational skills and the ability to perform multiple tasks.

Course Objectives:

  • Describe the roles and responsibilities of the Public Safety Telecommunicator.
  • Describe the communication equipment and maintenance.
  • Describe maps, logs, resources, and troubleshooting initial response.
  • Describe the functions of a communication center.
  • Describe rules and regulations, policies, and standard
    operating procedures.
  • Describe placing responding units on emergency incidents.
  • Describe the challenges for the twenty-first century Public Safety Telecommunicator.